Best fucked up books -

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Not fucked up in an obscene sense (that much), but I find Brave New World to be pretty interesting take on a fucked up dystopia. That is, it's not a dystopia, if you described the world of Brave New World for most urbanites they'd say it's an utopia: Free drugs, easy sex, no responsibility, no need to think about work at home and government issued orgies. The idea of why this is dystopia is hard to explain since it's arguing for the benefit of suffering and envy. It excudes wrongness that you cannot describe.

People try to argue that the society of Brave New World is inhuman. I disagree, the society is very much human, it's a society of literal manchildren. They hop around from entertaiment to entertaiment, do jobs they can't really fail in and immerse themselves in bullshit cliques. The most adult person between them (that isn't in charge of everything) is a 30 year old guy that laughs like a 17 year old when he encounters something deep. It makes the book more sensible than other dystopias like 1984 that describes an authoritarian state that is seemingly omnipotent and omnipresent, yet is described almost cartoonishly incompetent.

So yeah, that was my autistic take on Brave New World, I recommend reading it if you haven't. Pretty enlightning and very disturbing considering that today's society endgoal is the world described in the book.
 

BrunoMattei

Vincent Dawn
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My main social group circulate book after book to each other, and the only book I've had any of them complain about was The Conspiracy Against The Human Race by Thomas Ligotti, mostly the complaints were that it was too dark or unsettling to finish reading. I think the author is actually trying to disturb and alienate his readers.

"The Conspiracy against the Human Race is renowned horror writer Thomas Ligotti's first work of nonfiction. Through impressively wide-ranging discussions of and reflections on literary and philosophical works of a pessimistic bent, he shows that the greatest horrors are not the products of our imagination. The worst and most plentiful horrors are instead to be found in reality. Mr. Ligotti's calm, but often bloodcurdling turns of phrase, evoke the dreadfulness of the human condition. Those who cannot bear the truth will pretend this is another work of fiction, but in doing so they perpetuate the conspiracy of the book's title."

--David Benatar, author of Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence; Department of Philosophy, University of Cape Town, South Africa
I've been reading this in short and controlled bursts while at work. I think that's the best way to read philosophy because your brain needs time to absorb the ideas. I remember I read The Antichrist in 2-3 hours and barely remember anything of it now.

I really liked it, I'm near the end of it. Have about 100 pages left. It's one of the best Philosophical and also nihilistic works I've read in a long while.

"Many people in this world are always looking to science to save them from something. But just as many, or more, prefer old and reputable belief systems and their sectarian offshoots for salvation. So they trust in the deity of the Old Testament, an incontinent dotard who soiled Himself and the universe with His corruption, a low-budget divinity passing itself off as the genuine article. (Ask the Gnostics.) They trust in Jesus Christ, a historical cipher stitched together like Frankenstein’s monster out of parts robbed from the graves of messiahs dead and buried—a savior on a stick. They trust in the virgin-pimping Allah and his Drum Major Mohammed, a prophet-come-lately who pioneered a new genus of humbuggery for an emerging market of believers that was not being adequately served by existing religious products. They trust in anything that authenticates their importance as persons, tribes, societies, and particularly as a species that will endure in this world and perhaps in an afterworld that may be uncertain in its reality and unclear in its layout, but which sates their craving for values not of this earth—that depressing, meaningless place their consciousness must sidestep every day. Sure enough, then, writers such as Zapffe, Schopenhauer, and Lovecraft only wrote their ticket to marginality when they failed to affirm the worth and wonder of humanity, the validity of its values (whether eternal or provisional), and, naturally, a world without a foreseeable end, or at least a world whose end no one wants to see."
 
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Y2K Baby

The Codex of Ultimate Wisdom???
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I've been reading this in short and controlled bursts while at work. I think that's the best way to read philosophy because your brain needs time to absorb the ideas. I remember I read The Antichrist in 2-3 hours and barely remember anything of it now.

I really liked it, I'm near the end of it. Have about 100 pages left. It's one of the best Philosophical and also nihilistic works I've read in a long while.

"Many people in this world are always looking to science to save them from something. But just as many, or more, prefer old and reputable belief systems and their sectarian offshoots for salvation. So they trust in the deity of the Old Testament, an incontinent dotard who soiled Himself and the universe with His corruption, a low-budget divinity passing itself off as the genuine article. (Ask the Gnostics.) They trust in Jesus Christ, a historical cipher stitched together like Frankenstein’s monster out of parts robbed from the graves of messiahs dead and buried—a savior on a stick. They trust in the virgin-pimping Allah and his Drum Major Mohammed, a prophet-come-lately who pioneered a new genus of humbuggery for an emerging market of believers that was not being adequately served by existing religious products. They trust in anything that authenticates their importance as persons, tribes, societies, and particularly as a species that will endure in this world and perhaps in an afterworld that may be uncertain in its reality and unclear in its layout, but which sates their craving for values not of this earth—that depressing, meaningless place their consciousness must sidestep every day. Sure enough, then, writers such as Zapffe, Schopenhauer, and Lovecraft only wrote their ticket to marginality when they failed to affirm the worth and wonder of humanity, the validity of its values (whether eternal or provisional), and, naturally, a world without a foreseeable end, or at least a world whose end no one wants to see."
Edgy and disgustingly English.
:neckbeard:
 

Y2K Baby

The Codex of Ultimate Wisdom???
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Not fucked up in an obscene sense (that much), but I find Brave New World to be pretty interesting take on a fucked up dystopia. That is, it's not a dystopia, if you described the world of Brave New World for most urbanites they'd say it's an utopia: Free drugs, easy sex, no responsibility, no need to think about work at home and government issued orgies. The idea of why this is dystopia is hard to explain since it's arguing for the benefit of suffering and envy. It excudes wrongness that you cannot describe.

People try to argue that the society of Brave New World is inhuman. I disagree, the society is very much human, it's a society of literal manchildren. They hop around from entertaiment to entertaiment, do jobs they can't really fail in and immerse themselves in bullshit cliques. The most adult person between them (that isn't in charge of everything) is a 30 year old guy that laughs like a 17 year old when he encounters something deep. It makes the book more sensible than other dystopias like 1984 that describes an authoritarian state that is seemingly omnipotent and omnipresent, yet is described almost cartoonishly incompetent.

So yeah, that was my autistic take on Brave New World, I recommend reading it if you haven't. Pretty enlightning and very disturbing considering that today's society endgoal is the world described in the book.
Glad you just read something you should have read in highschool, you little /pol/ sped.
 

The 8 of Spades

Knows Where Peter Popoff's Miracle Spring Is.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I've been reading this in short and controlled bursts while at work. I think that's the best way to read philosophy because your brain needs time to absorb the ideas. I remember I read The Antichrist in 2-3 hours and barely remember anything of it now.

I really liked it, I'm near the end of it. Have about 100 pages left. It's one of the best Philosophical and also nihilistic works I've read in a long while.

"Many people in this world are always looking to science to save them from something. But just as many, or more, prefer old and reputable belief systems and their sectarian offshoots for salvation. So they trust in the deity of the Old Testament, an incontinent dotard who soiled Himself and the universe with His corruption, a low-budget divinity passing itself off as the genuine article. (Ask the Gnostics.) They trust in Jesus Christ, a historical cipher stitched together like Frankenstein’s monster out of parts robbed from the graves of messiahs dead and buried—a savior on a stick. They trust in the virgin-pimping Allah and his Drum Major Mohammed, a prophet-come-lately who pioneered a new genus of humbuggery for an emerging market of believers that was not being adequately served by existing religious products. They trust in anything that authenticates their importance as persons, tribes, societies, and particularly as a species that will endure in this world and perhaps in an afterworld that may be uncertain in its reality and unclear in its layout, but which sates their craving for values not of this earth—that depressing, meaningless place their consciousness must sidestep every day. Sure enough, then, writers such as Zapffe, Schopenhauer, and Lovecraft only wrote their ticket to marginality when they failed to affirm the worth and wonder of humanity, the validity of its values (whether eternal or provisional), and, naturally, a world without a foreseeable end, or at least a world whose end no one wants to see."
I've searched out most of the texts he references and I'm not surprised it's an ignored branch of philosophy. I'm not sure most people could handle that level of sheer destructive nihilism really, you've got to be kind of broken to appreciate it.

Edit: @Y2K Baby write "Shitposting as a philosophy" then lol.
 

Y2K Baby

The Codex of Ultimate Wisdom???
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I've searched out most of the texts he references and I'm not surprised it's an ignored branch of philosophy. I'm not sure most people could handle that level of sheer destructive nihilism really, you've got to be kind of broken to appreciate it.

Edit: @Y2K Baby write "Shitposting as a philosophy" then lol.
What you fucking say to me, stupid?
 

BrunoMattei

Vincent Dawn
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Glad you just read something you should have read in highschool, you little /pol/ sped.
At least he went to high school unlike Mr./Ms. Middle School drop out over here.

I've searched out most of the texts he references and I'm not surprised it's an ignored branch of philosophy. I'm not sure most people could handle that level of sheer destructive nihilism really, you've got to be kind of broken to appreciate it.

Edit: @Y2K Baby write "Shitposting as a philosophy" then lol.
I've read a decent number of works Ligotti references like Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Last Messiah essay. I've subscribed to Nietzsche's point that the meaning of life may be in it self meaningless but let us create a meaning, let us be better people, the pursuit of art and all that. And then Hitler took those ideas to heart...

Edit: I subscribe to most of Nietzsche's points with a dash of Bill Hicks:

 
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