Kiwi Running Club -

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
I've had a few enforced weeks off, but back to it yesterday with four progressive miles (9:30 down to 7:30) then walked home as the heat was making me feel nauseous.

Still not managed to find a suitable race to aim at. Going to sit down and make a proper plan, 3-4 sessions per week.

First few weeks will be hill focused. Probably one workout a week, with a mix of:
- Kenyan Hills (steady pace up and down)
- Hill repeats
- Pyramids
- Progressive hill efforts

Then one long(er) run, building up to around 9 miles, one tempo run of about an hour, and a quicker 3-4 mile run.

Next phase then will be speed focused. Same kind of breakdown of sessions, hut with a variety of speed workouts (10x 400m; 4x mile repeats; some track work) and possibly some fartleks as part of the shorter run. Also extend the longer run out to 12 miles or so.

In with them will be some erg (rower) sessions, and a bit of yoga and/or climbing.
 

Cardenio

*YAWN*
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I only use elliptical machines or stationary bicycles. I've read one too many stories of runners hurting their knees from too much running.
 

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
I only use elliptical machines or stationary bicycles. I've read one too many stories of runners hurting their knees from too much running.
Then you should read some of the actual research which shows this to be nonsensical.

1) Almost no-one ever hurt their knees from 'too much running'. Shin splints from too much too quickly yes, but the human body is not a mechanical engineering entity with parts that wear out; rather, it rebuilds itself stronger in response to use.

2) The main 'overuse' injury in relation to knees that people seem to be worried about is osteo-arthritis. The evidence overwhelmingly shows that the opposite is true: runners have lower levels of osteo-arthritis. While the interaction isn't fully established, it appears to be that use helps build strength, while the negative effects of sedentary lifestyle on joint health are far more significant.

3) From an anecdotal perspective, you're probably better not sticking to just those exercises. Yes they minimise direct impact, but you're also heavily training a few key muscles while leaving others untrained (for example, those machines may be leading you to neglect hip flexors which in time will make you more susceptible to injury from falling or poor form). While complementary activities focused on core and strength are beneficial, running is one of the most effective all-round workouts.

4) Running is loads cheaper than the gym! You might expect to get through two pairs of trainers a year at a total cost of $250, but that's half the $500 average cost of gym membership (and you still need trainers there anyway).

If you're happy with the elliptical and stationary bike then by all means stick with it (though I'd also suggest adding some work on the rower too, and some supplementary strength work). But don't be put off running due to scare stories about its impact on the knees.
 

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
I enjoy running and do it pretty consistently. Mostly on the treadmill these days as my kids are too young to leave in the house alone.

I used to race all the time, but I've slowed down in my advanced age, and as such my love of racing also diminished.
All relative! I didn't start until I was much older, so never had any great level of competitive achievement to begin with. I like racing though for the challenge and the sociability of it.
 

Brussels Sprout

Call any vegetable
kiwifarms.net
Today for the first time I ran a 5k with no walk breaks! My time was not exactly impressive but I think it was in the realm of normal for a newbie. I'm really pleased! I needed a win today.

I was thinking of signing up for a proper 5k race in my area in the fall but I'd be doing it all alone and I'm intimidated lol but at least I know I can physically do it.
 

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
Today for the first time I ran a 5k with no walk breaks! My time was not exactly impressive but I think it was in the realm of normal for a newbie. I'm really pleased! I needed a win today.

I was thinking of signing up for a proper 5k race in my area in the fall but I'd be doing it all alone and I'm intimidated lol but at least I know I can physically do it.
Well done! Impressive is entirely relative, so you've every right to be pleased and recognised for it.

As a target, I'd keep building endurance if you can rather than stopping there though. The magic threshold is an hour I think, as once you get to that it's relatively straightforward to get back to it if you stop for a while. 5k or half an hour is less of a base and can easily be lost with a few weeks of injury or just lack of motivation.
 

Brussels Sprout

Call any vegetable
kiwifarms.net
Well done! Impressive is entirely relative, so you've every right to be pleased and recognised for it.

As a target, I'd keep building endurance if you can rather than stopping there though. The magic threshold is an hour I think, as once you get to that it's relatively straightforward to get back to it if you stop for a while. 5k or half an hour is less of a base and can easily be lost with a few weeks of injury or just lack of motivation.
Thanks fren :) I'm with you on the endurance; I'm much more interested in being able to keep going than being fast right now.
 

deadtofaunus

kiwifarms.net
New best split is 4:34, with an average of 5:47 over 4km. I think I might've gone a bit overboard in that first km, but otherwise I'm quite giddy at my rate of progress. I don't expect it to hold up, though I believe my mental approach this time around will be much more conducive to long-term progress: self-compassion is the key. Be kind to yourselves, folks.
 

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
Been away from the farms for a bit, but so happy to you all out here killing it and being cool to each other ❤️

Had a good run yesterday, but I'm feeling it in my right knee today.
Ah, been a bit shit over the last couple of weeks, lacking the motivation to do the training. Have a couple of races in the diary now though, so something to work towards.

Runners need to squat heavy and lift, bodybuilders need to be able to move without getting gassed.
Depends on the running you want to do! If I'm running up hill, the last think I want to be doing is hauling an extra 20lb up with me, doesn't make any difference whether that is 20lb of muscle, or 20lb of fat.

Runners need strength, but for most we don't need or want bulk.
 

Gar For Archer

kiwifarms.net
What’s the better exercise, jogging at a consistent pace for 2 miles, or running as fast as you can for one mile and walking/speed walking the second mile?
 

Ugandan discussions

kiwifarms.net
What’s the better exercise, jogging at a consistent pace for 2 miles, or running as fast as you can for one mile and walking/speed walking the second mile?
Depends what you're trying to achieve! At 2.miles, you're barely warmed up before you stop.

If that is your limit currently, I'd focus first on building towards a point where you can sustain an hour of running at a steady pace (enough that you can still maintain a conversation). This will probably be somewhere around 9-11km/5.5-6.5 miles. Couch to 5k and various other programmes have well refined programmes to help you do this.

Once you get to the magic hour, you would then probably benefit from using a mix of paces, so longer runs at a slower pace and shorter interval sessions.

If you can do 3 per week, you could aim to do:

Tempo run: find a pace you can hold reasonably comfortably for 20-30 mins. (As you build endurance, you'll be able to quicken it a bit and extend it out gradually to about an hour)

Intervals: Run a gentle half mile (not more than 50% effort) to warm up, then do 8x 400m at 80% effort with 60s walk between each. Jog another gentle half mile to cool down. As you get stronger, add in a couple more reps, or find a hill to do them on, or look at some of the myriad other running workouts you can find online.

Long run: 60%-70% effort. Aim to do at least an hour, building up to 90 mins or more. This is much about time on feet as about distance, so don't get hung up on pace. Rather, focus on form and breathing.
 

Azovka

kiwifarms.net
Anybody here have running shoe recommendations?
Depends on where you're running and what's your foot position when you hit the ground. If you overpronate (as in, your ankle rolls inward with every step), I highly recommend Asics Kayano shoes. They're great for stability. Otherwise, New Balance v860 are a solid choice too.
If you want neutral shoes, Asics NovaBlast or Nike Wildhorse if you run trails. But then again, it's just personal pics. And Hoka shoes are usually the best for max cushioning.

If you buy running shoes in a brick & mortar store, which I recommend if you have no idea what to chose, they usually let you take them out for a run in front of the shop or on a treadmill if they have one so you can see if you feel comfortable.
And don't forget to get running shoes one size (or at the very least half a size) larger than your regular shoes because your feet will swell when you run. To get an idea of what size you need, just place your thumb at the edge of the toebox - you should have the width of your thumb of space available.
 

Jew-ish

kiwifarms.net
Depends on where you're running and what's your foot position when you hit the ground. If you overpronate (as in, your ankle rolls inward with every step), I highly recommend Asics Kayano shoes. They're great for stability. Otherwise, New Balance v860 are a solid choice too.
If you want neutral shoes, Asics NovaBlast or Nike Wildhorse if you run trails. But then again, it's just personal pics. And Hoka shoes are usually the best for max cushioning.

If you buy running shoes in a brick & mortar store, which I recommend if you have no idea what to chose, they usually let you take them out for a run in front of the shop or on a treadmill if they have one so you can see if you feel comfortable.
And don't forget to get running shoes one size (or at the very least half a size) larger than your regular shoes because your feet will swell when you run. To get an idea of what size you need, just place your thumb at the edge of the toebox - you should have the width of your thumb of space available.
Thanks for the input.

FWIW I run mostly on concrete/asphalt and I do my best to run on the balls of my feet.
 

Azovka

kiwifarms.net
Thanks for the input.

FWIW I run mostly on concrete/asphalt and I do my best to run on the balls of my feet.
Oh, for asphalt, I'd recommend more cushioning.
Personally, I run with Asics Kayanos 27 because I overpronate (my right ankle is pretty fucked due to repeated injuries and bends inwards), but they aren't the best in terms of cushioning. I still love them and they work fine for me, but most of my friends swear by the Asics Gel Nimbus 22 or else Hokas.

Ultimately, it's a question of personal preference, and although a lot of runners will say that "the shoe makes or breaks the run", most shoes are fairly similar. So when you're settled on your size, how much cushioning you want, what drop & weight, you can just pick any model that fits your criteria to start with, and see how it goes from there.

Also, there is a difference in shoes made for speed work and those for long runs. In French, running shoes made for interval training and generally speed are called "balancier", meaning pendulum. If you look at the pics below just to give an example, you see that there's a lot of empty space under the toebox. It's especially egregious in the Tri Noosa ones, so the shoe works as a pendulum of sorts, and it's supposed to help you run faster.
chaussure-de-running-react-infinity-run-flyknit-2-pour-rdSxZS.jpeg
18505565fbe7631b0bf01.23103467.jpg


Compare that with the long run shoes for concrete below.
Screenshot 2021-08-26 at 18.43.52.png
Hoka_One_One_Bondi_7.jpeg

So if you had to chose, I'd suggest going for the long run shoes. The general consensus seems to be that they're more stable and thus reduce the risk of injuries when you run. At least that's what I've heard chiropractors and podiatrists say.

And finally, and I know it's not feasible for everyone, but try not to always run on asphalt if you can. It's way rougher on the knees than ground, track, or even sand. What's been suggested to me when I first started running was to go through parks to vary the surfaces a bit.
 

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