Long Distance Walking - Day Hikes, Through Hikes

Mr. ShadowCreek

kiwifarms.net
I'm usually on my feet 8 hours a day do I get some exercise from that. On most days after work I day a run around the neighborhood and main road. I didn't actually start running daily until about 12 years ago when I took my new dog out for walks. Despite being skinny I knew I was sort of out of shape. I would be completely out of breath by doing the mile. Today I run out for 20 or 30 minutes without getting tired. I usually also do 30-40 sit-ups being I go. Would like to improve it by going in more cul-de-sacs.
 

Dr. Geronimo

Echo chambers are bad for your health.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Can anyone here recommend some good hiking shoes? I plan on putting in some miles during a trip to the Ozarks so I need a good pair for moderate hiking.

I've heard good things about Oboz. Would you guys recommend as well? Any specific shoe of theirs? $110-145 would be my price range.
 

Zebedee

Lives under beds, feeding on fanta stains.
kiwifarms.net
I end up walking a ridiculous amount daily, something numbering between 20-25k steps but conversely it’s my only form of excercise. It’s like the only proper means for me to unwind after work and actually manage to sleep.
 

shameful existence

Hellenic imperfection of form
kiwifarms.net
I used to love solo walks and hikes, and now they depress me more than anything else on Earth.
I'm dealing with this too. I've always walked a lot. It's the only cardio I can stand. I even did some night hikes by myself. But lately they have been impacting my mood terribly. The long ones in particular. I slip into some destructive thought patterns when out for too long, and come back home upset and anxious. Silencing it by listening to something only works for a while. Really sucks because walks used to be therapeutic to me.
 

Benzo Samurai

kiwifarms.net
I'm dealing with this too. I've always walked a lot. It's the only cardio I can stand. I even did some night hikes by myself. But lately they have been impacting my mood terribly. The long ones in particular. I slip into some destructive thought patterns when out for too long, and come back home upset and anxious. Silencing it by listening to something only works for a while. Really sucks because walks used to be therapeutic to me.
I used to love solo walks and hikes, and now they depress me more than anything else on Earth.

I used to struggle with the same issue a few months back, so I have a lot of compassion for those feels <3 I started to walk in nature instead of city/town which helped a lot but not immediately. I realized that I was just running away from my own emotions in any way possible and that I had to be cool with just being with myself in my own mind and body from moment to moment.

I did some things to try to actually *do* that. I cut drastically down on distractive content like listening to streams/watching movies/podcasts etc, so that I just had to face my own mind more. I didn't give anything up forever, I was just looking to limit and control my consumption of digital media. I also reminded myself, when it got hard, of how people back in the day totally lived without constant stimuli from computers, and I also started to practice meditation(just standard gay buddhist stuff.)

the most important thing, by far, was just to sit more in silence, away from the computer, alone, without my mind going haywire.
 
Can anyone here recommend some good hiking shoes? I plan on putting in some miles during a trip to the Ozarks so I need a good pair for moderate hiking.

I've heard good things about Oboz. Would you guys recommend as well? Any specific shoe of theirs? $110-145 would be my price range.

Solomons are often thought of highly for trail walking. I don't know many other US brands.
 

Sweet and Savoury

Null-like homunculus
kiwifarms.net
Just an FYI for anyone baller enough whose considering either the Appy or PCT

When I started the Appy I was a solid 212lbs. 6 months and 11 days later I was 178lbs.

Get used to hunger.

Quick edit here becuz of some questions.

Yes, it was totally worth doing. Yes it took 6 months and almost 10K of money. Yes if I was younger I would do it over again.

Seriously, both the Appalachian and Pacific Coast trails are something any serious hiker needs to do. Reminder that you don't have to do it all in one go like I did. You can break them up into chunks. Its an experience you'll remember for the rest of your life and conquering the Appy makes the challenges that enter your life seem like cake. Really.

Do it faggot!
 
Last edited:
Just an FYI for anyone baller enough whose considering either the Appy or PCT

When I started the Appy I was a solid 212lbs. 6 months and 11 days later I was 178lbs.

Get used to hunger.

You definitely always lose weight on these things and the longer you're out the greater the weight loss is.

I might make an update for notes on winter time hiking soon.
 
So the fundamentals for Winter style hiking.

  • Clothing for cold weather. You want to dress in clothing that allows for some venting and have a layer stowed that will act heavily as an insulator. In very cold conditions, if you keep a moderate to good pace, you will sweat and you don't want to exacerbate this by wearing a really thick insulative layer. Polar explorers often go out for long distances in lighter style jackets because of this fact. The main thing to consider clothing wise in extreme colds is an insulative layer IE thermals, a outer clothing layer, pants and shirt, and a jacket. Fleece is always a good choice, fleece lined hiking trousers and a fleece inside layer with a good outer jacket will keep you very warm. Cover the extremities, face, head, and hands with the warmest articles of clothing, wool or synthetics. Feet should be covered in wool socks, and wear appropriate footwear that will allow for warmer travel, snow boots with a liner.
  • Clothing for rainy weather, water proof wind breakers for an outer layer and a pair of water proof trousers stowed to wear if it really comes hammering down. Wet weather in most cases you will be warm as long as you remain fairly dry, and water proofs trap heat, so be prepared. If hiking in the rain, remove the outer layer of trousers before putting on your water proof trousers, or you will sweat uncomfortably. Don't worry about being cold, as long as you are actively maintaining movement, you will remain warm.
  • WEATHER WEATHER WEATHER. Check the weather, check it religiously. If you're planning on going out in terrible weather conditions, then you might want to have a rethink. Try to go when there is clear skies reported, or in the case of rainy climates, mild precipitation.
  • Distances. In colder weather you will usually move slower than you normally would. The main reason for this is the fact that you have the added challenge of weather conditions, whether that is muddy or snowy, it will add a challenge to the amount of distance you can cover and you need to plan ahead for this. Planned breaks are important in these situations and it should be somewhere which you know is sheltered and provides warmth. It's also good to have a call in plan, where you contact someone within a specific time limit to let them know how you are. Also make sure you have situation appropriate equipment, rocky icy places you will want crampons, deep snow, snow shoes. It is better to not need them than need them.
  • Managing your expectations. Winter weather is no joke, people can and do die in winter conditions and hypothermia is a real issue. In shorter distance hikes, it will likely not effect you unless you are out in the worst style of conditions. The added challenges are chillblaines, frost bite, snow blindness. Vaseline can help with acting as a barrier for chillblained feet and avoiding frost bite, as well as adequate skin covering. Snow blindness can be avoided by wearing a good pair of UV blocking glasses, or in an absolute bind fire ash smeared on the eyelids and a peaked cap. (Hopefully you never would have to resort to that.) I would aim for shorter distances than you would normally travel due to inclement weather and also the fact that you will have less daylight hours in which to travel and you do not really want to be stuck outdoors in the cold at night.
  • Make yourself aware and practice winter survival situations. You can learn theory all you want, but theory and doing are two completely different things, so practice in safe situations spending a night in a hogan or a winter tent. Always try to over prepare as it will help if you get yourself into a tricky situation.
  • I do not recommend travelling alone unless you know the area well.
  • I recommend packing extra high energy food, you burn more calories in winter conditions due to the loss of body heat. If you have a thermal canteen that is excellent to keep up with warm fluids or if you have a small transportable stove or hobo stove to heat water that also helps as well. In a situation where you don't have these items, a small plastic or aluminium canteen worn around your neck inside between your internal and external layers should be kept warm enough to not freeze. (It goes without saying do not eat snow unless absolutely necessary, it saps the body of warmth.)
  • Be mindful of hypothermia. The body will adjust to the cold, but you don't want to be out for extended periods and sedentary. Hypothermia sets in slowly unless in emergency situations, and it usually what kills most people outdoors. Signs of hypothermia setting in include slowing down, feeling sleepy, delirium, extreme cold in the extremities. You should know how to recognise it and treat it. Most cases it will only be a mild onset condition, but the body does have a tipping point for internal temperatures where it causes complete shutdown, organ failure and finally death.
Winter hiking can be really fun. I hope you find some time to explore and enjoy the outdoors.
 

Brahma

kiwifarms.net
I've gotten into the habit of carrying a bunch of these around, even for shorter walks in winter. One takes up no more space than a pack of tissues and can come really handy when you get stuck somewhere for a bit with a twisted ankle or whatever.
Similarly I'll usually take an emergency bivvy bag or if I'm with a group there's a bothy bag and some extra bits distributed around as well as everyones personal kit


I prefer the bivvy style foil bags rather than the blankets because they're better for keeping the cold out if you need to sit I find.


The bothy is handy full stop. Amazing what a morale booster it can be to whip it out in the middle of a downpour and be able to fix a hot cup of tea for everyone on a stove.
 

I Cant Breev

kiwifarms.net
Just an FYI for anyone baller enough whose considering either the Appy or PCT

When I started the Appy I was a solid 212lbs. 6 months and 11 days later I was 178lbs.
My old roomate did the Appalachian back in 2019 and dropped around 65lbs when all was said and done. That shit aint no joke.

He did tell me it was one of the most exhausting but rewarding things he ever did. I hope I can find the time to do it someday.
 
Top