Music videos that shaped your childhood - MTV, BET, Youtube for zoomies. Whatever left an imprint on you as a kid.

sasazuka

Standing in the school hallway.
kiwifarms.net
From my earliest memories. George Harrison - who’s totes doing the stunts, don’t tell me otherwise - bringing the quirk. George was a staple of my youth, being my mother’s favorite Beatle. Thirty Three & 1/3 was religiously played on a wicked set of speakers she had that made George sound more frightening than he really was. This assuaged my little soul:

Speaking of George Harrison, I quite likely saw the Eric Idle-directed "Crackerbox Palace" music video a couple of times on British TV as a 2-year old, mere months before my family moved to Canada.


I'm not 100% sure I saw it when I was a toddler but I had a fuzzy early childhood memory of having seen something on television with gnomes suddenly appearing from behind bushes but I had no idea what it might have been until I saw this music video as an adult decades later. The video was released in January 1977, which fits the timeframe of when I believe I would have first seen it perfectly.

I would like to think that the first music video I ever watched might have been from ABBA, and I do have other fuzzy memories of having watched something on television with people singing dressed in white (very likely the Lasse Hallström-directed "Mamma Mia!" video) but I suspect George Harrison beat them to the punch (in terms of what I personally saw first; I know the "Mamma Mia!" video predates the "Crackerbox Palace" video by almost two years).

 

albert macdonald chan

Novice computer programmer and Norm Macdonald fan
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net

Remembered seeing this in a mall once growing up. I was hooked on Daft Punk ever since.


Was probably the only kid in my school that had pictures of them and the Wu-Tang Clan in my locker. I used to think I was cool for listening to 90’s rap instead of rap that was current at the time.
 

ladyhimitsu

lady of the pink, ruler of the stink
kiwifarms.net

i was on youtube and THIS music video shocked my delicate childlike sensibilities.


this musical brainrot made me gay. i can’t explain how, i gust know that the general cacophony of fuckery in this mv fruititized me.


there was a shooting in virginia tech i think and the murderer made a video with this song in the background.


was gay growing up in the late 00s. had access to the internet. self-explanatory.


whatever song was in that 1 lunatic 1 icepick.

the song that was in 2 girls 1 cup.
 

Idiotron

The last sane person on Earth
kiwifarms.net
I will focus on music videos, regardless of the quality of the song itself.

I'm a breakdancer (big part of my life, can't see myself living without it) and there are a few late 90's/early 00's videos that inspired me to start when I was a kid.
One of them was Bomfunk MC's - Freestyler but that's been mentioned so here are a few other ones:
 

Solid Snek

True & Honest Fan
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"Shaped your childhood"? Probably mostly late 90s/early 00s stuff, from back when I was real little:

GWAR; only saw this once, but it changed my life. Comes closest to embodying my overall outlook on life.

Rammstein; still remember where I was and what I was doing when Kid Me first saw it. Remember being blown away by the thought that there were bands from strange foreign countries who, despite being foreign, weren't dogshit.

White Zombie; introduced me to a shitload of things, including horror movies, fine arts, and animu.

Republica; Kid Me was obsessed with the song, spent weeks tracking down the sauce, but only saw it once (pre-YT years, horrible times, horrible). Along with Robert Miles, got me into electronic stuff.

TSO; introduced me to Savatage and, by extension, metal hipsterism.

Sneaker Pimps; groomed me into chill music and probably most closely encapsulates the "mythic" 90s I still have in my memories.


Then there's a gap in the 00s; I was still watching music videos, and a lot of my favorites were from the 00s - but I don't know if I can say any of them "shaped my childhood", since by the time I saw those vids, I was already on that basic path anyway. The corruption started early. However:

Andrew WK; technically wasn't a kid when it came out, but it definitely shaped College Me. Childhood's end, and the beginning of the endless misery of adult life.
 

Solid Snek

True & Honest Fan
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One of them was Bomfunk MC's - Freestyler
Ok, sorry for the doublepost, but seeing as this has been posted several times in this thread: what was the deal with Bomfunk MCs?

I don't remember Bomfunk MCs at all. Zilch, nada, no recollection. Yet for some reason, YT recommends that music video to me constantly. It doesn't matter what I'm doing or what I'm watching or even really which account/device I'm using; I probably see it in my sidebar at least once every few days.

Were they really popular at one point? Maybe in a particular country or for people of a particular age demographic or cultural interest group?


I'm not saying the video is shit, I wound up listening to it once or twice and it was OK, but I'm getting worried that this is some Mandela Effect thing, like maybe I grew up in the universe where Bomfunk MCs never existed.
 

Idiotron

The last sane person on Earth
kiwifarms.net
Ok, sorry for the doublepost, but seeing as this has been posted several times in this thread: what was the deal with Bomfunk MCs?

I don't remember Bomfunk MCs at all. Zilch, nada, no recollection. Yet for some reason, YT recommends that music video to me constantly. It doesn't matter what I'm doing or what I'm watching or even really which account/device I'm using; I probably see it in my sidebar at least once every few days.

Were they really popular at one point? Maybe in a particular country or for people of a particular age demographic or cultural interest group?
Are you from North America?
I remember watching MTV back in 2000 one day and the US charts were on, Freestyler was barely hanging on in the top 50.
At the same time, it was number 1 in Europe.
I guess Americans just didn't respond to it.
 

Solid Snek

True & Honest Fan
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Are you from North America?
I remember watching MTV back in 2000 one day and the US charts were on, Freestyler was barely hanging on in the top 50.
At the same time, it was number 1 in Europe.
I guess Americans just didn't respond to it.
Ah, ok, that might be it! I'm from Europe, but my family moved to America when I was little, and while I got exposed to Old Country favorites on holiday, Bomfunk must have slipped through the cracks.

I had an interest in breakdance, too (possibly part of the reason why YT thinks I love Bomfunk). Didn't stick with it as I got older, and in my neighbourhood the breakers were mostly South Korean techno fans rather than the more traditional b-boy rap, but I can see why those vids inspired you! It's cool to hear you're still involved with the lifestyle.

I think Tech N9ne shaped me as a kid, too, but more on account of his metal crossover stuff rather than breakdancing. Him and Run DMC were the first rappers I enjoyed unironically, but I don't think there was a particular music video I can trace it to (Run DMC I think I liked because they were on some GTA soundtracks, and Tech was something a juggalo buddy of mine had downloaded).

-edit- yeah, OK, looked Bomfunk up on Wikipedia, and it says that song was
  • made in Finland (I have a lot of Finnish bands on my playlists), and
  • blew up in 2000 (same year as Darude, which was insanely popular where I lived, and must have pushed Bomfunk out the window)

Apparently it's a Zoomer meme now? Christ I feel old...
 
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Weeb Slinger

kiwifarms.net
I was in stitches the first time I saw the video for Bronski Beat's cover version of the Gerswhin classic It Ain't Necessarily So (From Porgy and Bess) which follows the fortunes of two prisoners who engage in a mince pie eating contest during a Christmas church service. It's a masterclass in storytelling using the pop video format, and really captures the aesthetic of England's borstals in the 1980s.


During the 80s, in the UK at least, it was within the realms of possibility for a band to dress up like Laurence of Arabia in press photographs, release a song about nuclear armageddon and have a top 30 single. Pop music was weird in a way that it never has been again.

Michael Caine by Madness is apparently about an IRA informer who has to assume a new identity and subsequently descends into mental illness. It reached number 11.


The reason I remember the video to Bananarama's A Trick of the Night - a murky collage of night time urban imagery - is because of a show called In At The Deep End, where either Chris Serle or Paul Heiney (both light entertainment TV presenters) would have to learn a new trade from scratch. Heiney made a video for the song which the band hated, but which I actually preferred. The lyrics, incidentally, are about a young man who moves to the city and ends up working as a male prosttute. Number 32 in the charts with a bullet!


What happens when you wave a copy of a William Burroughs novel in the direction of one of the UK's biggest bands and then set them loose on a sound stage filled with props from Mad Max 2 and Alien? The answer is, you get the video to Wild Boys by Duran Duran, with Simon Le Bon tethered to the sail of a windmill being dragged through a filthy pond. I was a kid when this came out, who was not even aware of Alien, and so was blown away by the appearance of the chestburster-type monster at the conclusion.


There's a moment in the video for Annie I'm Not Your Daddy by King Creole and the Coconuts, where the singer is being menaced by 1980s Amazons whose faces are contorted in anger as they stab at the air with sticks. You could be watching an anti-Trump rally. We've come full around circle.


I vividly recall seeing the video for Joe Jackson's - Steppin' Out on Top of the Pops - A maid dancing around a hotel room, clutching a striped satin dress belonging to its occupant, imagining that she is out on a dinner date with the weird looking piano player in the room next door (Jackson). I like the twist at the ending where Jackson is also revealed to be an imposter, who has broken into the room of a composer.

 

Pissmaster

True & Honest Fan
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Are you from North America?
I remember watching MTV back in 2000 one day and the US charts were on, Freestyler was barely hanging on in the top 50.
At the same time, it was number 1 in Europe.
I guess Americans just didn't respond to it.
Electronica like that was considered super gay in America at that time, and you'd get called a fag at school for liking anything like it.

I watched MTV2 and saw more Insane Clown Posse videos than anything electronica at the time. Never saw Freestyler, Sandstorm, Days Go By, Barbie Girl, or Better Off Alone, for that matter.

Though then again, Eiffel 65's Blue and ATC's All Around the World still got played. Who knows what their criteria was.
 

Easton daniels

yass queen the house down cunty slayyy
kiwifarms.net
remeember my grandma showing this to me when I was 8. No idea what was happening but years later, still super into it
also don't know if this counts as a music video, but I used to watch this over and over at the same age, not knowing who or what touhou was
 

Tootsie Bear

kiwifarms.net

First time seeing video game influence in music videos in the late 90's or early 2000's. Don't remember the year it was released.
 
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