Ready Player One -

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AF 802

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kiwifarms.net
I started reading this book a while back, stopped after the first chapter. Seemed it was trying to push stupid.

People are retarded if they actually go to see this movie, because of the hypocrites they truly are.
 

Elwood P. Dowd

kiwifarms.net

Well, it basically broke even in its theatrical release. Assuming studios keep ~ 50% of the domestic gross and ~ 33% of the overseas gross AND assming a 100% match on the production budget for marketing (not included in production costs)...I'm too lazy to run the numbers, but I'd guesstimate Sony's take in the $90 million range vs. $100 million in total costs. But that also means streaming/Blu-Ray/DVD etc., push this thing to profitability.

So, clearly not a hit. Still, did not see that coming. Thought it was a complete bomb.
 
A

AF 802

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kiwifarms.net
Well, it basically broke even in its theatrical release. Assuming studios keep ~ 50% of the domestic gross and ~ 33% of the overseas gross AND assming a 100% match on the production budget for marketing (not included in production costs)...I'm too lazy to run the numbers, but I'd guesstimate Sony's take in the $90 million range vs. $100 million in total costs. But that also means streaming/Blu-Ray/DVD etc., push this thing to profitability.

So, clearly not a hit. Still, did not see that coming. Thought it was a complete bomb.

Probably a lot of it little children who are too young to own a smartphone, but something their parents used to shut them up because "pretty colors oooo".
 

Somsnosa

Look at me! I'm the pope now
kiwifarms.net
I wouldn't be surprised if half of the people who sperg over the movie haven't even read the book.
I hope so for them cause the book is 10 times the spergfest. There is really a random pop culture reference every 2 lines. I imagine Spielberg has toned it down a bit
 

Elwood P. Dowd

kiwifarms.net
Reviews are dropping. Angry Joe really liked it. Even IGN liked it.

But..thank Jeebus for the Verge. Damn. You'd think they're discussing a recently deceased loved one, and what the funeral arrangements should be.


To say nothing of the hypocrisy of "Waah...muh cultural references," as they sit in a studio drinking out of a Mario themed coffee mug with a shelf in the back full of nerd kitsch. Only about eight minutes into it, but wow.
 

UnclePhil

Concern dismissals all around.
kiwifarms.net
I was able to stay with the book until he has to mimic every line and stage direction from WarGames. After that the pages just keep getting stickier.
 

soryu

Jerry Mouse
kiwifarms.net
Salt is tasty.
rp1.PNG

I've also seen this guy sperg out about somehow wrong subtitles in a recent mecha anime blu-ray release. He was nonstop @'ing the company every day for about two weeks.
 

Elwood P. Dowd

kiwifarms.net
AV Club being AV club. Not sure if this is salt or them just being massive retards. Do they get props for leaving the original up? :\

NEWSWIRE
Not even Steven Spielberg could get the rights to Star Wars for Ready Player One

Alex McLevy

Yesterday 10:28am
Filed to: READY PLAYER ONE
654
mdcr8qrmwdy1jhbma93y.png

These may be the droids you’re looking for, but tough shit.
Screenshot: YouTube

If the advance word from SXSW is accurate and Steven Spielberg has created a reminder for grumpy readers that yes, it is possible to make something decent out of something not so decent, then it may be fun watching Ready Player One after all. But even the king of popcorn movies has limits, it seems.

During a recent press talk featuring Spielberg and much of the film’s cast, the director admitted that, despite his best efforts, he wasn’t able to secure one of the most iconic pop-culture properties of the 20th century for his adaptation of Ernest Cline’s book. As io9 reports, no amount of phone calls to Disney (which presumably went something along the lines of, “Are you fucking kidding me?! I’m Steven fucking Spielberg, motherfuckers”) were sufficient to get the rights to Star Wars. Spielberg and his producer Kristie Macosko Krieger worked for three years diligently nailing down the multifarious agreements needed to secure the vast swath of pop-culture references depicted in the film. But even though the book has a scene involving an X-Wing fighter, Disney refused any and all efforts, leaving Spielberg and his crew as bereft of rebel ships as the end of The Last Jedi.



“We couldn’t get any Star Wars rights,” Spielberg said. “[We tried] very hard. They wouldn’t give up the Star Wars rights.” It was probably right around then that Spielberg wished his old buddy George Lucas still owned the rights; Lucas let Robot Chicken use Star Wars, for god’s sake. It wasn’t the only property the Ready Player One team wasn’t able to secure—Japanese superhero Ultraman is embroiled in a lawsuit right now, preventing that property being being included as well—but it’s easily the most noteworthy one for American audiences.

At least one member of the cast thought Spielberg didn’t exhaust all of his options: Ben Mendelsohn, he of main villain fame in Rogue One. “You could’ve called me on that one, Steve,” said Mendelsohn. “I built the Death Star, I’m just saying.”


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NEWSWIRE
Well, nevermind, then: Of course there's going to be Star Wars shit in Ready Player One

William Hughes

Today 11:42am
Filed to: FILM
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What a scamp!
Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer (Getty Images)
Like some sort of romance-averse space scoundrel, trying to keep his princess crush on the down-low, Steven Spielberg is sending a lot of mixed signals this weekend. Yesterday, we reported on a press conference the director gave about his upcoming film Ready Player One at SXSW, in which he reportedly said, “We couldn’t get any Star Wars rights,” in reference to the film’s over-flowing grab-bag of references. “[We tried] very hard,” he added. “They wouldn’t give up the Star Wars rights.”




Except they did, apparently; that’s per no less authoritative a source than, well, Ready Player One director Steven Spielberg. Fandango’s Erik Davis posted an interview clip of Spielberg talking about the film yesterday, mentioning how a number of studios—including Disney—apparently bent over backwards to help him assemble Ernest Cline’s overwhelming collage of ’80s pop culture beats. Spielberg goes so far as to name a few Star Warselements—an appearance by R2-D2 and an X-Wing, both of which are mentioned in the book—as specific Easter Eggs, which raises the question: What gives, Steven?

It’s possible that Spielberg was just quoted out of context or misheard, of course (although he supposedly bantered a bit with Rogue One/Ready Player One star Ben Mendelsohn about his whole “we couldn’t get the rights” thing, which seems like it’d have to be a pretty elaborate fabrication). Or maybe he misspoke, and his interview with Davis was an attempt to clear the air. Or (and this is just our personal pet theory), maybe the Spielberg at the press conference was actually some kind of rogue CGI avatar, accidentally unleashed on the Earth from the future, and sent on a mission to harvest a rich bounty of disappointed nerd tears.

Interestingly, Spielberg notes in the interview that he was very careful about which Star Wars references made the film’s cut, given that the franchise is a still-living creature that extends well past his film’s nostalgic milieu. “That’s really part of our contemporary world right now, and even though it began in the ’80s, it is so much a part of our real life today in the 21st century. So we asked for some of the smaller items and Disney gave us everything we asked for,” this version of the director told Davis. Attendees at this year’s SXSW, where the film had its surprise world premiere, already presumably know which Steven was telling the truth; the rest of us will have to wait until the film debuts on March 29.
 

Jigglyjogglers

The Doctor Bashir guy
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I find it absolutely hilarious that the same people who get actually, honestly fucking angry over this "condescending pandering" are just living up to an entirely different and less flattering nerd stereotype than the nerd stereotype they think the people who made it saw them as.
 
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